Make your own free website on Tripod.com


The step-by-step disassembly instructions presented here apply to both the Stingray 1 and 2, and are a companion to our Maintenance, Cleaning and Lubrication Guide. The only difference between the two Stingray models is the barrel and top frame - the 'Ray 2 doesn't have a barrel shroud, and thus has a different top frame. You can also refer to the Technical Drawings for more information.

I highly recommend laying down an old towel to protect your table, and to help keep round things from rolling away. Putting some plastic (drop cloth, garbage bag, etc.) under the towel will protect the work surface from getting oily. Use an old plastic margarine container, egg carton, or similar container to put all the small parts in.

Tools Needed:

Step 1: Begin by removing the plastic pins that hold in the aluminum barrel and plastic shroud on the 'Ray 1, or the aluminum barrel only on the 'Ray 2. If the pins are tight, you can push them out from the other side with a 5/32" allen wrench or 3/16" pin punch. You may need to tap lightly with a hammer. Note: Some 'Rays have quick strip pins with rings which pull out easily.

The barrel and shroud ('Ray 1) or barrel ('Ray 2) should pull right out. It may be stuck with dirt and/or dried paint goo, but a gentle side to side motion should work it free. If only the shroud on the 'Ray 1 comes out, no problem. Pull the shroud all the way off, then pull out the barrel.

Step 2: Remove the plastic pins that hold the grip frame to the top frame. If they're tight, you can push them out from the other side with a 5/32" allen wrench or 3/16" pin punch. You may need to tap lightly with a hammer. Note: Some 'Rays have quick strip pins with rings which pull out easily. After the pins are out, pull the grip frame and top frame apart.

This is what you should have so far:

A - top frame; B - grip frame; C - retaining pins, long; D - retaining pin, short; E - top frame pin; F - cocking screw; G - barrel and shroud

Remember, if you have a 'Ray 2, you'll have just an aluminum barrel, without the plastic shroud.

Step 3: Remove the cocking screw by turning it counter clockwise. (Righty tighty, lefty loosey!) If it's stubborn, use a pair of pliers to loosen it. Wrap a rag around it first, to protect it from the pliers.

Step 4: From either side, using your 3/16" pin punch (or #10 x 3" machine screw, or 16 penney nail) and hammer, tap out the pin that holds the valve and tube assembly in place.

Step 5: Lay the top frame on the table, and carefully slide out the valve and tube assembly.

If the valve and tube assembly doesn't want to slide out, the velocity screw may be holding it in. Using your 5/32" allen wrench, screw the velocity screw in a few turns.

To remove the detent ball, you'll need to push out the roll pin which holds in the detent cap. Using a 1/16" pin punch (or nail or awl), push the pin from one side until you can pull it out with pliers. Put a finger over the cap before fully removing the pin, or you'll lose parts. When the pin is out, very carefully remove the cap, spring, and ball.

Here are the detent parts:

A - detent ball (the stock ball is steel, not the acrylic which is shown); B - detent spring; C - detent cap; D - detent pin

When reassembling the detent assembly, put the ball in first, then make sure the large end of the spring goes against the ball. Caerfully hold the cap in place with a finger, line up the holes, and push the pin through. You may have to work with it a bit to get the pin to go all the way through. A little finesse is called for here.

Here is the valve and tube assembly. If any pins fell out after you removed it, that's okay. Just don't loose them!

Step 6: Remove the bolt by lifting the transfer link out of the slot in the hammer, and sliding the bolt forward off the bolt guide.

Step 7: Remove the pins that hold the donkey (CA adapter) in place. They may have already fallen out, or they might fall out with a little gentle pushing and pulling on the donkey. If not, tap them out with your 3/32" allen wrench or 1/8" pin punch.

Pull the donkey out. The transfer tube will probably stay in either the donkey or the valve - go ahead and pull it out.

The donkey and one end of the transfer tube. The urethane o-ring on the transfer tube can be clearly seen.

The "business" end of the donkey. This is where the CO2 tank screws in. You can see the brass colored depressor pin inside. The depressor pin is what depresses the pin valve on the CO2 tank.

Step 8: Remove the valve pin. This pin may have already fallen out, or it might fall out with a little gentle pushing and pulling on the valve. If not, tap it out with your 3/32" allen wrench or 1/8" pin punch.

Slide the valve out in the direction of the arrow. If it's stuck, do NOT use pliers on the bolt guide. Instead, push it out, after you've removed the hammer and spring (see below). Or, using a wooden dowel or the handle of your scredriver, tap gently on the back of the valve housing where it sticks through the top of the hammer tube (opposite the velocity screw).

Step 9: Push out the hammer, spring, and spring guide. There may be a little resistance. If the valve is out, you can push the parts out in the direction of the arrow, with a long screwdriver or piece of dowel. Or, carefully push the spring and guide out by putting a screwdriver tip in the slot in the hammer (bottom photo), and pushing them out. The hammer should then come right out.

Here are all the parts you've taken out of the valve tube assembly:

A - valve assembly; B - transfer tube; C - donkey; D - valve pin; E - valve tube; F - hammer; G - hammer spring; H - hammer bumper; I - spring guide; J - bolt; K - bolt transfer link; L - donkey pins

Step 10: Using your butter knife or large screwdriver, remove the valve retainer by turning it counter clockwise. Careful, it's spring loaded!

After the valve seal retainer is loose, remove it slowly by hand, being careful not to let the valve stem shoot out.

The valve stem, seal, and spring should slide out easily.

There are two parts down inside the valve housing, the washer and o-ring. Carefully pull them out, using a dental pick, or small screwdriver.

Here are all the parts you've taken out of the valve assembly:

A - valve body/bolt guide; B - velocity screw; C - urethane o-ring; D - valve washer; E - valve spring; F - valve stem; G - valve seal; H - valve seal retainer

When reassembling, make sure the urethane o-ring is seated in the groove down inside the valve housing.

One side of the valve washer has a ridge on it. Make sure, when reassembling, that the ridge side goes in first (towards the o-ring).

When putting the valve seal back on the valve stem, make sure the ridge on the seal faces the brass retainer.

Obviously, reassembly is the reverse of disassembly. Just follow the disassembly directions backwards, and you'll get it all back together!


© Stingray Toters INternet Group